Tonight, Blake and I ventured to downtown Annapolis, Maryland, to see the Parade of Lights. When we got there, we walked over the Spa Creek Bridge from Eastport, Maryland, and past a smoking Annapolis Yacht Club. Fast-forward and Blake was on the phone with 911 while flames melted the glass windows and spread higher.

Next, we took out our phones to capture the tragedy. First, I took a video for my Snapchat My Story. It’s pretty noteworthy to be at the scene of a fire — a first for me. Then, my photos went to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. The Annapolis Fire Department tweeted back asking to use my photo; they warned people to steer clear of the area until further notice. WTOP used my Twitter photo in a slideshow for its news report. Friends and family were sharing my posts to let others know what was going on because the bridge shut down and people were either stuck in Annapolis or stuck in Easport. A policewoman was ushering people off of the bridge for their safety; however, they (and me) were slow moving as phones snapped photos.

annapolis fire

In the midst of the calamity, I kept thinking how stupid I must appear because I was wildly snapping photos and sharing them to social media. However, if it wasn’t for my photos and videos, people would’ve driven to Annapolis only to be disappointed that the Parade of Lights was cancelled. People would’ve been stuck in traffic to the Spa Creek Bridge and then would’ve been forced to turn around when they met police cars and yellow tape. People wouldn’t have had as up-to-date information as they did. People would’ve wasted their time.

It’s okay to get information right away. It’s okay to want to share your life with others. It’s okay to connect with others and be their eyes and ears.

Call me a brainwashed millennial, but this is not a post about how the need to be constantly connected is ruining our lives. It almost was, but then I realized how much I appreciate my digital networks and having the world at my fingertips.

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